Posts Tagged ‘making disciples’

Een preek over ‘Familie: Het doel van de opvoeding’. Spreker: Paul Washer

Making Disciples vs. Baptizing Goats – The Mission of the Church – A sermon preached by Conrad Mbewe at the 2014 G3 Conference.

 

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Recently, we posted a link to an article by Trevin Wax titled “The Great Commission Means Sharing Christ’s Story, Not Yours.”  In it, he cautions us against the popular tendency to emphasize what Christ has done in our lives at the expense of sharing what Christ has done in history, namely, his death and resurrection. This notion that evangelism cannot be equated with sharing your personal testimony received some pushback. However, it seems to us that Wax’s article, is appropriate and timely. Here’s why:

  1. The gospel we are to preach is not essentially the good news of how you have been changed. Rather, it is the good news of how God saves. If we are to proclaim the gospel throughout the world (which we are), then we ought to be clear on what the gospel is … and it is not ultimately about you. Jesus is the object of our faith, and thus, the focal…

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David Platt discusses the tragic cost of non-discipleship.

He says, “…the cost of discipleship is great. To live with radical abandonment for His glory, faithful adherence to His person, urgent obedience to His ministry—this is costly. This could cost us, or the people we lead, our lives. But I submit to you this morning that the cost of non-discipleship is far, far, far greater. The cost of non-discipleship is great for scores of people in the church sitting comfortably right now under the banner of Christianity, but have never counted the cost of following Christ—many eternally deceived.

There’s great cost for all who settle for casual association with Jesus and miss out on the abundance and satisfaction and joy that he has designed for us. There’s a cost that comes to monotonous routine Christianity. Don’t do it and don’t lead churches like that. We’ll waste our lives away like that. The cost will be great for us and the church…And the cost of nominal Christianity will be great for those who are lost in this world.

For people in our communities, our cities, for people groups are the world who will go on without the Gospel, because we are content with not making disciples of all the nations. Because in our casual approach to Christianity we are leaving them on a road that leads to an eternal hell. The consequences to casual cultural Christianity are tragic—eternally tragic…Let’s follow Him with abandonment for His glory, with dependance of His grace, with adherence to His Person, and with urgent obedience to His mission.”

Making Disciples

Posted: June 7, 2014 by revivalbiblestudy315 in Multiply Movement
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Note from the editor: This excerpt by Joe Thorn originally appeared here at JOETHORN.NET on August 22, 2007.

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As we are developing ministries for our new church in the Chicago suburbs we are starting from scratch. From leadership development, to worship, to mercy ministries, to discipleship we are not buying pre-packaged material or simply using someone else’s system. There are a lot of reasons for this that I will get into later, but one of the things I have been thinking a lot about is the issue of making disciples.

For many Christians, the idea of making disciples boils down to a kind of intellectual development. I have been a part of churches that considered themselves “strong in discipleship” which meant they took theology seriously and taught their members everything from the nature of God, to the ordo salutis. While I believe this is a foundational component of discipleship, it…

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Paul Washer is founder of the HeartCry Missionary Society. Wretched Radio is a modern Christian TV and Radio show with host Todd Friel. http://www.wretchedradio.com

HeartCry is a missionary society with one great and overriding passion: that God’s Name be Great among the Nations (Malachi 1:11) and that the Lamb receive the full reward for His suffering (Revelation 7:9-10).

“Who am I to tell 597 million people that if they do not turn from their sin and trust in Jesus every single one of them will spend eternity in hell?”

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As we remember the suffering of our Lord this week, leading up to Good Friday, we should take special note of his response toward those who reviled him. Namely, none. He did not respond. “He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he did not open his mouth; like a lamb that is led to the slaughter, and like a sheep that before its shearers is silent, so he opened not his mouth,” (Is 53:7). That is the prophetic description of Jesus’ suffering by Isaiah, hundreds of years prior to his crucifixion.

Now, here is Peter’s description of Jesus’ suffering some years after he went to the cross:

For this is a gracious thing, when, mindful of God, one endures sorrows while suffering unjustly. For what credit is it if, when you sin and are beaten for it, you endure? But if when you do good and suffer for it you endure…

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Below is an excerpt from The Multiply Movement material, www.multiplymovement.com, part 1 section 2 question 5

Equipped to Do the Work of Ministry

Unfortunately, disciple making has become the exclusive domain of pastors (and missionaries). Salesmen sell, insurance agents insure, and ministers minister. At least, that’s the way it works in most of our churches. While it’s true that the pastors, elders, and apostles in the New Testament made disciples, we can’t overlook the fact that discipleship was everyone’s job. The members of the early church took their responsibility to make disciples very seriously. To them, the church wasn’t a corporation run by a CEO. Rather, they compared the church to a body that functions properly only when every member is doing its part. Paul explained the function of the church in Ephesians 4:11–16: He gave the apostles, the prophets, the evangelists, the shepherds and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ … we are to grow up in every way into him who is the head, into Christ, from whom the whole body, joined and held together by every joint with which it is equipped, when each part is working properly, makes the body grow so that it builds itself up in love. Paul saw the church as a community of redeemed people in which each person is actively involved in doing the work of ministry. The pastor is not the minister—at least not in the way we typically think of a minister. The pastor is the equipper, and every member of the church is a minister. The implications are huge. Don’t think of this as merely a theological issue. See yourself in this passage. Paul said that your job is to do the work of ministry! Jesus commanded you to make disciples! Most Christians can give a number of reasons why they cannot or should not disciple other people: “I don’t feel called to minister.” “I just have too much on my plate right now; I don’t have time to invest in other people.” “I don’t know enough.” “I have too many issues of my own. I’ll start once I get my life in order.” As convincing as these excuses may seem to us, Jesus’s commands don’t come with exception clauses. He doesn’t tell us to follow unless we’re busy. He doesn’t call us to love our neighbors unless we don’t feel prepared. In fact, if you read Luke 9:57–62, you’ll see several individuals who gave excuses for why they couldn’t follow Jesus at the time. Read the passage and take note of how Jesus responded to them. It may surprise you. God made you the way you are; He has provided and will continue to provide you with everything you need to accomplish the task. Jesus commands you to look at the people around you and start making them into disciples. Obviously, only God can change people’s hearts and make them want to become followers. We just have to be obedient in making the effort to teach them, even though we still have plenty to learn ourselves.

       5. What excuses tend to keep you from following Jesus’s command to make disciples? What do you need to do in order to move past these excuses?

 

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Making a Plan

In today’s busy world, making disciples can fall by the wayside as things of far less importance are elevated to priority status.  It takes hard work, sacrifice, and intentionality to obey the Great Commission.  We wan to point you toward a great tool that will help you rightly orient your life to make this possible.

Pastor David Platt recently encouraged members of his church to create a “personal disciple-making plan.”  Click HERE to watch to full sermon.  If creating such a plan sounds like a good idea to you but also sounds a bit ambitious and overwhelming, Pastor David has helped by posing six questions for us to consider.  Answering these six questions will lay out a plan to help you make disciples better this year.  According to Brook Hills, “This plan uses six straightforward questions laid out in the PDF available for download below to help you flesh out…

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