Lecture on the topic of ” The Cross and the healing of Nations ” on 16th Jan 2016 at YMCA New Delhi.

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This is the 12th and final lecture in the Apologetics and Evangelism Course offered by the For the Mission Institute.

As we do outreach, it is very likely that we will encounter people from various cults and false religions. In our last Apologetics lesson, Pastor Dan Adams​ gives us some ideas for refuting the false teaching that we encounter.

Part of For the Mission’s 2 year missionary training program, see bottom of the page for more details.

For the Mission is a non-profit missions agency located in Pensacola, Florida. We are in the mission to take the Gospel to the nations and make disciples of every people group on earth. The FTM institute functions in partnership with Ekklesia Theological Seminary and support of a few local like-minded churches. It was created as part of FTM’s missionary training/equipping program and seeks to provide free theological teaching for those called to become missionary’s.

In this first lesson in Old Testament I, Pastor Cody Mathews examines the storyline of scripture (OT) and presents some helpful ways for better understanding of the Bible.

Part of For the Mission’s 2 year missionary training program, see bottom of the page for more details.

For the Mission is a non-profit missions agency located in Pensacola, Florida. We are in the mission to take the Gospel to the nations and make disciples of every people group on earth. The FTM institute functions in partnership with Ekklesia Theological Seminary and support of a few local like-minded churches. It was created as part of FTM’s missionary training/equipping program and seeks to provide free theological teaching for those called to become missionary’s.

In the 8th lecture to the Biblical Counseling course, Pastor Jon Mark Olesky​ looks at humanity as walking in three paths, not two, and how this makes clear the centrality of the Gospel. He also helps clarify the difference between religion and the gospel.

Part of For the Mission’s 2 year missionary training program, see bottom of the page for more details.

For the Mission is a non-profit missions agency located in Pensacola, Florida. We are in the mission to take the Gospel to the nations and make disciples of every people group on earth. The FTM institute functions in partnership with Ekklesia Theological Seminary and support of a few local like-minded churches. It was created as part of FTM’s missionary training/equipping program and seeks to provide free theological teaching for those called to become missionary’s.

Fatalism, pessimism, and escapism have paralysed many cultures. The key to the West’s amazing progress was optimism. Where did it come from?

Thomas Hobbes, an atheist philosopher, described life as “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short.”

Gautam Buddha, India’s most influential sage, believed that “Life is suffering.” The only way to escape suffering is to escape life into the Nothingness of Nirvana.

The West became different because something enabled it to sing, “Joy to the world, the Lord has come.” What was the secret of that optimism?

2017 marked the 100th anniversary of the Communist Revolution in Russia. Hardly anyone is celebrating it even though that revolution was immensely influential. Its aftershocks continue until today, creating havoc in many nations.

Before Communism came the French Revolution. Its ideals were high: Liberty, Fraternity, and Equality. It replaced God with the goddess of human reason – but degenerated into a Reign of Terror before ending in the dictatorship of Napoleon Bonaparte.

The Russian and French Revolutions were the outcome of the Enlightenment’s faith in man. They taught us that when man tries to become the messiah, he becomes a monster.

A decade before the French Revolution, Americans began their Revolutionary War in 1776. They succeeded in building one of history’s greatest and freest nations. Prior to the American Revolution, the English Civil War had also succeeded in changing Britain. Historian Jacques Barzun pointed out that the English and American Revolutions were ripple effects of the German Reformation.

He wrote that the Sixteenth Century Reformation was the most influential revolution of the last millennium. It reformed nations and created the modern world of freedoms and progress.

The German, English, and American Revolutions succeeded because they began as spiritual movements. The reformers sought the purity of their own hearts before seeking the reform of their nations. They did not fight for power and positions for themselves. They fought for principles, for truth.

Communists call religion “the opium of the masses”. The historical fact is that the Christian hope of Heaven was not just consolation for hardship in this life; it enabled Christians to endure hardship now. Because Christ had given them eternal life, they were not afraid to die. They stood up to tyrants. Eleven of Jesus’ twelve Apostles were martyred for what the Reformation saw as the “freedom of belief”. Christians continue to brave death for their faith in many countries today.

Ideologies such as Communism, Fascism and Socialism put their hope in man. They were disappointed. The Reformers put their hope in Jesus, because he conquered sin and death. Reformers did not fight because they wanted to rule this world. They fought because they prayed, “Your kingdom come; your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.”

God’s will was to be done in the hearts of believers, as well as bring healing to every sphere of life. One of the Reformation’s chief legacies is that corrupt, cruel and poor nations can be reformed. They can be freed from intolerance, superstition, and oppression.

The Reformers would have agreed that religion is the opium of the masses. But faith in a living God results in hope.

Lecture 11 on Apologetics and Evangelism from For the Mission. In this lesson, Pastor Dan Adams​ presents reasons why we should believe in the Resurrection of Jesus Christ and why the Resurrection is central to the Christian faith. Check out the video.

Part of For the Mission’s 2 year missionary training program, see bottom of the page for more details.

For the Mission is a non-profit missions agency located in Pensacola, Florida. We are in the mission to take the Gospel to the nations and make disciples of every people group on earth. The FTM institute functions in partnership with Ekklesia Theological Seminary and support of a few local like-minded churches. It was created as part of FTM’s missionary training/equipping program and seeks to provide free theological teaching for those called to become missionary’s.

This is the 12th and final lecture in the Survey in Church History course from For the Mission. In this lesson, Dr. Jonny White​ discusses the period from the Great Awakening in America to the present day.

Part of For the Mission’s 2 year missionary training program, see bottom of the page for more details.

For the Mission is a non-profit missions agency located in Pensacola, Florida. We are in the mission to take the Gospel to the nations and make disciples of every people group on earth. The FTM institute functions in partnership with Ekklesia Theological Seminary and support of a few local like-minded churches. It was created as part of FTM’s missionary training/equipping program and seeks to provide free theological teaching for those called to become missionary’s.

Lecture 7 in the Biblical Counseling course from For the Mission Institute. In this lecture in Biblical Counseling, Pastor Jon Mark helps us understand the inner man often called the “heart”, “soul”, or “mind”, there interplay, distinctions and centrality in how they cause us to do what we do, and how we change at the deepest level.

Part of For the Mission’s 2 year missionary training program, see bottom of the page for more details.

For the Mission is a non-profit missions agency located in Pensacola, Florida. We are in the mission to take the Gospel to the nations and make disciples of every people group on earth. The FTM institute functions in partnership with Ekklesia Theological Seminary and support of a few local like-minded churches. It was created as part of FTM’s missionary training/equipping program and seeks to provide free theological teaching for those called to become missionary’s.

Corruption costs the world about 1 trillion dollars each year. It transfers wealth from the powerless to the powerful. A corrupt people cannot trust their own society. Globally, corruption is the norm. I was surprised that some cultures found a CURE.

My first experience of a culture of trust was in Holland. My host took me to a dairy to buy milk. I had never heard of machines milking cows. No one was selling the milk. My friend just opened the tap and filled his jug. Then he grabbed a bowl filled with cash. He paid in a 20 Guilder note, took the change, and started walking away with his milk. I was stunned. I said, “Man! If you were an Indian, you would take the milk and the money!”

He laughed. In a flash I understood a basic cause of my nation’s poverty. If customers took the milk and the money, the dairy owner would have to hire a salesgirl. But if the consumer is corrupt, why would the supplier be honest? He would add water to increase the quantity of milk. Frustrated by watered-down milk, the consumer would ask the government to appoint Milk Inspectors. But why should the Inspector be honest? He would take bribes and allow adulterated milk to be sold. The consumer will have to bear the cost of the milk, water, the sales-girl, the Inspector, and the bribe – none of which add any value to the milk. In paying for them, the consumer pays simply for his sin.

Paying for all this means that you don’t have money left to buy products that actually add value, such as milk turned into ice-cream or cheese.

How did Holland create a culture of integrity? Medieval Europe was as corrupt as India is today. Holland’s Reformation began in the soul of a German monk called Martin Luther. He struggled to find purity of heart. He followed all the religious rituals of his Church, fasted and prayed; went on pilgrimages; confessed every sin he could think of. But none of these gave Luther an assurance that all his sins were forgiven or that he was accepted by God.

The light dawned on Luther when he read New Testament writer Paul the apostle. Paul had also tried to become righteous by following his sect of Judaism. Then he learnt that our religious works or karma don’t make us righteous before God. They can make us religious bigots.

The Bible reveals a God who is very different from gods who want bribes in exchange for blessings. God sacrificed His own Son to save us. Our religious efforts cannot earn salvation. It is a gift received by faith. When the resurrected Christ came to live in his heart, Luther’s inner darkness turned into light. That enabled him to oppose the corruption of his church at the risk of his life.

Luther knew that protest does not eradicate corruption. Transforming a nation requires cultivating character. That is why God gave us the Scriptures. Apostle Paul wrote, “All Scripture is given by God’s inspiration, and is profitable for correction and instruction in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, thoroughly equipped for every good work” [2 Timothy 3: 16-17].

The desire to reform his nation inspired Luther to translate the Bible into German and promote a national educational system built upon God’s word.

Poverty does not cause corruption; corruption causes poverty. To combat both, our nations need more than aid, investment or protest. They need hearts and minds that are transformed.